Using Analytics to Build Your Funnels

In previous posts we talked about building ‘site funnels’.  Site funnels represent the page-by-page paths site visitors view before exiting your site.  In most cases, you’ll create paths based upon your projected user behavior. What we predict, and what actually occurs, may not always coincide.

Customer Focus

Focusing on customer wants and needs generally produces better results. Your perceived can’t lose ideas, at times fall flat. You want to make user visits more predictable.

Your visitors leave clues as to what they want. The secret decoder ring to these clues will be your analytics report. Users will provide a trail, indicating what natural paths or funnels they prefer to follow.

Like any good hunter, if you follow this trail, you can improve goal conversion with a few tweaks, rather than whole sale site changes. So let’s look at how to use some of those clues:

Use Your Analytics Report To Identify Most Viewed Pages »

  • The most viewed pages obviously contain the information visitors perceive as the most relevant to their needs. 
  • Make note of the ‘bounce’ rate.  A bounce rate of more than 40% signals that users might not be finding what they expected.
  • Now find the  ‘next pages’ statistics.

Follow the Navigation Summary »

  • Note the top two or three most popular next navigated pages.  Look at the percentages, anything under 20% can be ignored.
  • Continue through the navigation summary until you get to points where the exit rate is greater than 40%.

Analyze Your Natural Funnels »

  • Navigate to your site, and click through these user generated funnels
  • Pay close attention to points in the path where exit rates rise above 40%.
  • If the selected paths don’t end in goals, determine what types of goal content can be implemented.
  • Look for opportunities for new promotional ideas.

Develop Goals »

  • Now you can create new goal endings for your user created funnels. If you link to existing goals, make sure your links and text are relevant to the new path.
  • Use multivariate testing to find the funnel goal page that produces the best results.
  • Also utilize multivariate testing to determine user willingness to end these funnels sooner.
  • Think about adjustments to your keyword campaigns, that might lead to greater success.

Play with the percentages, they aren’t set in stone.  If the user defined funnels match your designed funnels, implement multivariate testing to improve weak conversions.  Use goal test points along paths, make the test points related to the most popular next pages.  Knowing where a visitor will most likely navigate next, provides a prime opportunity to begin cross selling.

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